Clinical Trials

Many of our physicians are also leading researchers in their specialties, making breakthroughs and contributing to discoveries that are shaping their fields. Their research may offer some of our patients the additional benefit of having access to treatments that are under review in clinical trials.

Enrolling in a study does not always include testing a new treatment. Participating in a study can be as simple as answering a phone survey every few months to help doctors better understand healthy development, the effectiveness of prevention behaviors or the progression of a disease state. You will never be enrolled in a clinical study without your consent, and our physicians will give you complete information about a study that interests you before you choose whether to take part.

Learn more on the Washington University Physicians website:
Read the frequently asked questions about clinical trials »

Get notifications from Volunteer for Health:
Register to hear when you may have matched to a study »

Find a study in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) registry:
Search studies in all specialties at Washington University »


Find a clinical trial in obstetrics and gynecology

To request more information about a study below, you may email dcr@wustl.edu.

Research: Gynecologic Oncology

  • A Randomized Phase II Study of Chemoradiation and Pembrolizumab for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    PI: Julie Schwarz, MD • Sponsors: Linda Duska & Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of immunotherapy in combination with chemotherapy and radiation (chemoradiation) for the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. Pembrolizumab, a type of immunotherapy called a checkpoint inhibitor, will be administered after or during chemoradiation.

    Contact: Stephanie Russell, MPH
    314-362-1705 | swrussell@wustl.edu

  • Behavioral Influences on Ovarian Cancer Progression: Role of Chemoresistance

    PI: Permal Thaker, MD • Sponsor: NIH

    The purpose of this study is to understand the relationships between psychological and social factors, the expression of chemoresistance related genes in tumor tissue, and the clinical outcomes in ovarian cancer patients. The significance of this research is that it may help in our understanding of risk factors for progression of ovarian cancer.

    Contact: Elena Jones
    314-747-0918 | jonesmariaelena@wustl.edu

  • CUTI (Cancer of the Uterus and Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence)

    Carolyn McCourt, MD • Jerry Lowder, MD

    UPDATE: This study is currently in progress. We are no longer recruiting for this study.
    The purpose of this study is to compare quality of life in women with endometrial cancer or atypical hyperplasia and Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) who undergo SUI and endometrial cancer surgery simultaneously to women that do not. In addition, this study will determine if there are differences in the clinical outcomes of women with SUI who have concurrent surgery compared to those that do not. Overall we expect women that choose concurrent SUI and cancer surgery will have improved quality of life (QoL) scores, but no difference in clinical outcomes.

    Contact: Zoe Jennings
    jenningsz@wudosis.wustl.edu

  • Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    PI: David Mutch, MD • NCI Cooperative Group

    This randomized phase III trial studies whether changes in diet and physical activity can increase the length of survival without the return of cancer (progression-free survival) compared with usual care in patients with previously treated stage II, III, or IV ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. A healthy diet and physical activity program and counseling may help patients make healthier lifestyle choices. It is not yet known whether changes in diet and exercise may help increase progression-free survival in patients with previously treated cancer.

    Contact: Stephanie Russell, MPH
    314-362-1705 | swrussell@wustl.edu

  • MK-3475 Immunotherapy in Endometrial Carcinoma

    PI: Dr. Premal Thaker, MD • Sponsors: Washington Unversity School of Medicine & MERCK

    The purpose of this research study is to learn more about how endometrial cancer responds to treatment with a drug called MK-3475 (also known as pembrolizumab).

    Contact: Stephanie Russell, MPH
    314-362-1705 | swrussell@wustl.edu

  • Olaparib or Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib Compared With Standard Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Platinum-Sensitive Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    PI: David Mutch, MD • Sponsor: NCI Cooperative Group

    This randomized phase III trial studies olaparib or cediranib maleate and olaparib to see how well they work compared with standard platinum-based chemotherapy in treating patients with platinum-sensitive ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back. Olaparib and cediranib maleate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Cediranib maleate may stop the growth of ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, paclitaxel, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether olaparib or cediranib maleate and olaparib is more effective than standard platinum-based chemotherapy in treating patients with platinum-sensitive ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.

    Contact: Stephanie Russell, MPH
    314-362-1705 | swrussell@wustl.edu

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin or Bleomycin Sulfate, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Sex Cord-Ovarian Stromal Tumors

    PI: David Mutch, MD • Sponsor: NCI Cooperative Group

    This randomized phase II trial studies paclitaxel and carboplatin to see how well they work compared with bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin in treating patients with sex cord-ovarian stromal tumors that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced) or has returned (recurrent). Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. It is not yet known which chemotherapy regimen is more effective in treating sex cord-ovarian stromal tumors.

    Contact: Stephanie Russell, MPH
    314-362-1705 | swrussell@wustl.edu

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III, IV, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    PI: David Mutch, MD • Sponsor: NCI Cooperative Group

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well paclitaxel, carboplatin, and metformin hydrochloride works and compares it to paclitaxel, carboplatin, and placebo in treating patients with endometrial cancer that is stage III, IV, or has come back. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Metformin hydrochloride may help paclitaxel and carboplatin work better by making cancer cells more sensitive to the drugs. It is not yet known whether paclitaxel and carboplatin is more effective with or without metformin hydrochloride in treating endometrial cancer.

    Contact: Stephanie Russell, MPH
    314-362-1705 | swrussell@wustl.edu

  • Radiation Therapy, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Vulva

    PI: David Mutch, MD • Sponsor: NCI Cooperative Group

    This phase II trial studies how well giving radiation therapy together with gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin work in treating patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving radiation therapy together with gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin may kill more tumor cells.

    Contact: Stephanie Russell, MPH
    314-362-1705 | swrussell@wustl.edu

  • Randomized Trial of Nivolumab with or without Ipilimumab in Patients with Persistent or Recurrent Epithelial Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    PI: David Mutch, MD • Sponsor: NCI Cooperative Group

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well nivolumab works with or without ipilimumab in treating patients with epithelial ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer that has not responded after prior treatment (persistent) or has come back (recurrent). Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.

    Contact: Stephanie Russell, MPH
    314-362-1705 | swrussell@wustl.edu