Clinical Trials

Many of our physicians are also leading researchers in their specialties, making breakthroughs and contributing to discoveries that are shaping their fields. Their research may offer some of our patients the additional benefit of having access to treatments that are under review in clinical trials.

Enrolling in a study does not always include testing a new treatment. Participating in a study can be as simple as answering a phone survey every few months to help doctors better understand healthy development, the effectiveness of prevention behaviors or the progression of a disease state. You will never be enrolled in a clinical study without your consent, and our physicians will give you complete information about a study that interests you before you choose whether to take part.

Learn more on the Washington University Physicians website:
Read the frequently asked questions about clinical trials »

Get notifications from Volunteer for Health:
Register to hear when you may have matched to a study »

Find a study in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) registry:
Search studies in all specialties at Washington University »


Find a clinical trial in obstetrics and gynecology

To request more information about a study below, you may email dcr@wustl.edu.

Research: Obstetrics & Maternal-Fetal

  • Preterm birth

    PI: George Macones, MD • Sponsored by March of Dimes

    The Washington University March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center is recruiting 1,000 volunteers for a study that follows women throughout pregnancy. The purpose is to learn more about how the body changes during pregnancy and why some babies are born too early. Ultimately, we hope our research will help to lower the rate of preterm birth, which is higher in St. Louis (12.5% of live births) and St. Louis County (10.6%) than the national average (9.6%), especially among black women.

    Visit the Prematurity Research Center website to learn more »

  • CHAP: Antihypertensive Therapy for Mild Chronic Hypertension during Pregnancy

    PI: Methodius Tuuli, MD • Sponsored by a NIH grant

    Antihypertensive therapy to a standardized BP goal <140/90, compared with ACOG recommendations (no treatment), for mild CHTN reduces the frequency of key adverse maternal and newborn outcomes associated with CHTN including 1) a composite perinatal outcome (perinatal death, placental abruption, severe preeclampsia or indicated PTB <35 weeks) and 2) SGA (birth weight <10th percentile).  The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether a BP treatment strategy to achieve targets that are beneficial for non-pregnant adults (<140/90 mmHg) is safe and effective during pregnancy. This is a multi-center randomized trial.

    Contact: Monica Anderson, RN, BSN
    314-747-1390 | andersonmr@wustl.edu

  • GDM group: Group versus Traditional Prenatal Care for Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PI: Ebony Carter, MD • Sponsored by CDTR funding

    A randomized trial to test group prenatal care on self-care activities, compared to traditional prenatal care, will improve glycemic control and, ultimately, maternal and neonatal outcomes in women with type 2 and gestational diabetes.

    Contact: Monica Anderson, RN, BSN
    314-747-1390 | andersonmr@wustl.edu

  • MAXI-K: The role and regulation of maxi-k channel during pregnancy

    PI: Sarah England, PhD • Sponsored by an NIH grant

    This is a prospective study looking at the control of muscle contractions of the uterus during labor by looking at channel proteins in the uterine muscle. These channel proteins are involved in muscle functions. Approximately 1000 women will be recruited from Barnes Jewish Hospital who are undergoing cesarean delivery or hysterectomy.

    Contact: Monica Anderson, RN, BSN
    314-747-1390 | andersonmr@wustl.edu

  • OMSS: Optimizing Management of the Second Stage of Labor

    PI: Alison Cahill, MD & Methodius Tuuli, MD • Sponsored by a NIH grant

    This is a multi-center randomized trial of nulliparous women to compare the effectiveness of immediate and delayed pushing in the second stage of labor. We aim to test the central hypothesis that immediate pushing in the second stage of labor increases spontaneous vaginal delivery, shortens duration of the second stage, and reduces adverse neonatal and maternal outcomes. Secondary aim is to determine the effect of immediate pushing on the rate of neonatal composite morbidity and determine the impact of immediate versus delayed pushing on objective and subjective measures of maternal pelvic floor morbidity.

    Contact: Monica Anderson, RN, BSN
    314-747-1390 | andersonmr@wustl.edu

  • Oxygen for Category II Intrauterine Fetal Resuscitation: A randomized, noninferiority trial

    PI: Raghuraman, Nandini, MD

    The objective of this study is to investigate the utility of maternal oxygen administration in patients with Category II FHT and to compare the effectiveness of this option to room air. Our hypothesis is that room air along, is not inferior to the current practice of maternal oxygen administration for category II FHT.

    Contact: Monica Anderson, RN, BSN
    314-747-1390 | andersonmr@wustl.edu

  • PPHTN: Furosemide for Prevention of Severe Postpartum Hypertension

    PI: Methodius Tuuli, MD

    A randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy and safety of postpartum furosemide for preventing severe postpartum hypertension in women with Gestational Hypertension or PreEclampsia. Our central hypothesis is that prophylactic postpartum furosemide, by promoting excretion of excess fluid and sodium, will reduce severe postpartum hypertension in high-risk women.

    Contact: Monica Anderson, RN, BSN
    314-747-1390 | andersonmr@wustl.edu

  • PREVENA: Prophylactic Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Obese Women after Cesarean

    PI: Methodius Tuuli, MD • Sponsored by a NIH grant

    A randomized trial to determine the effectiveness of prophylactic Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) in reducing the rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) after cesarean in obese women.  Assess the safety of prophylactic NPWT in obese women as measured by frequency of adverse events including skin blisters, erythema, wound bleeding, and prolonged wound drainage.  Determine the effect of prophylactic NPWT on the frequency and identity of bacteria, including antibiotic-resistant organisms, isolated from SSIs after cesarean in obese women.

    Contact: Monica Anderson, RN, BSN
    314-747-1390 | andersonmr@wustl.edu

  • Vaginal Prep: Vaginal Cleansing Before Cesarean Delivery to Reduce Infection: A Randomized Trial

    PI: Lorene Temming, MD

    A randomized trial to compare the standard-of-care preoperative abdominal cleansing to abdominal cleansing plus vaginal cleansing with povidone-iodine solution prior to cesarean delivery of women in labor.  To attempt to provide this Level 1 evidence by performing a clinical trial to test the central hypothesis that vaginal cleansing with povidone-iodine solution immediately prior to cesarean delivery reduces postcesarean infectious morbidity.

    Contact: Monica Anderson, RN, BSN
    314-747-1390 | andersonmr@wustl.edu

  • Women’s and infant’s health specimen collection and processing

    PI: Ann Gronowski, PhD; Kelle Moley, MD

    The study aim is to create a structure to facilitate the collection of patient specimens for women and infant’s health research. The Women and Infants Health Specimen Consortium provides specimen collection, specimen storage and processing, as well as the maintenance of a comprehensive database of outcomes data.

    Contact: Monica Anderson, RN, BSN
    314-747-1390 | andersonmr@wustl.edu